Working papers and Proceedings

Phonological Rule Change: The Constant Rate Effect

Josef Fruehwald , Jonathan Gress-Wright and Joel Wallenberg (2013)

Abstract

The detailed quantitative study of language change, as found in studies such as Labov (1994) and Kroch (1989), has raised two central questions for linguistic theory. The first is an issue in the theory of language change itself, namely: do changes in different components of the grammar progress in the

Presented at NELS 40, 2009

Published Proceedings NELS 40

Paper


New results from hierarchical models of the community grammar

Josef Fruehwald and Laurel MacKenzie (2012)

Abstract

We explore the novel results made possible by fitting hierarchical models to speech community data. Specifically, these models produce estimates for the degree to which a speech community coheres to a communal norm.

Presented at NWAV 40

Published in Penn Working Papers in Linguistics

Handout [PDF]


Redevelopment of a Morphological Class

Josef Fruehwald (2012)

Abstract

In this paper, I will be focusing on the difference between semiweak and regular past tense in terms of TD Deletion. Specifically, I will pursue a revised version of the analysis in Guy and Boyd (1990), casting it in terms of Competing Grammars (Kroch, 1989) and Distributed Morphology (Halle and

Presented at PLC 35, 2011

Published PWPL 18.1

Handout
Paper


The Spread of Raising: Opacity, Lexicalization, and diffusion

Josef Fruehwald (2008)

Abstract

The centralization of the low upgliding diphthong (typically called Canadian Raising, here just Raising), is frequently cited as an example of phonological opacity. Conditioned by a following voiceless segment, Raising continues to apply when an underlying unstressed /t/ is flapped on the surface. Dialects which have both Raising and Flapping,

Presented at NWAV 36, 2008

Published Penn Working Papers in Linguistics 14.2

Paper


The Spread of Raising: Opacity, Lexicalization, and diffusion

Josef Fruehwald (2007)

Abstract

Canadian Raising is typically described as the centralization of the nucleus of /ay/ before voiceless segments. However some recent studies in areas affected by Raising have shown that the current conditioning factors are not as regular as reported previously (Vance, 1987; Dailey-OCain, 1997; Hall, 2005). This paper explores the status

Published as Undergraduate Thesis

Paper