Talks

Gender effects on inter and intra-speaker variance in sound change

Josef Fruehwald (2017)

Abstract

Virtually all analysis of sound change in progress has focused on how averages change over time (e.g. mean normalized F1), with relatively less quantitative focus on how variances may change (e.g. normalized F1 standard deviation). Linear mixed effects models do provide estimates of inter-speaker variance (Johnson 2009; Drager & Hay

Presented at NWAV46

Slides [pdf]


Studying Changes in Pronunciation With gamms

Josef Fruehwald (2017)

Abstract

Pronunciations play out across two radically different time scales. The first is on the order of milliseconds, from the beginning of pronouncing a speech sound to the end, during which your tongue and other articulators carry out carefully detailed and coordinated gestures. The second is across generational time, as the

Presented at EdinbR: The Edinburgh R User group

html slides


Choice of Word Frequency Norms can Dramatically Affect Inference

Josef Fruehwald (2017)

Abstract

Presented at UKLVC11

Poster [PDF]


Similar production, different perception: Social meaning in cross-linguistic speech perception


Gay and straight French and German men use different /s/-es, but don’t perceive them differently.


Inter- and intra- speaker variance in sound change

Josef Fruehwald (2017)

Abstract

I model the (non) shifts in variance over time in two sound changes.

Presented at Workshop on Sound Change 4

Handout [PDF]


Closely aligning our quantitative methods with our sociolinguistic theories

Josef Fruehwald (2017)

Abstract

I walk through some examples of Stan Modelling

Presented at Innovative Methods in Socilinguistics II

Handout [PDF]


Sexual orientation, masculinity, and cross-linguistic perceptions of /s/.

Zac Boyd , Josef Fruehwald and Lauren Hall-Lew (2016)

Abstract

To what extent are English respondents willing to apply their socioindexical knowledge of /s/ variation to languages they have limited or no knowledge of?

Presented at NWAV 45

Poster


The nasal invasion: Predicting systematic change in dialect contact


Dynamic Diachronic Formants

Josef Fruehwald (2016)

Abstract

Presented at BAAP 2016


Filled Pauses as a Sociolinguistic Variable

Josef Fruehwald (2015)

Abstract

Presented at NWAV44

HTML5 Slides


Social Meaning and Information Theory

Josef Fruehwald (2015)

Abstract

I applied information theoretic principles to evaluate the informativity of a linguistic variable as a signaling system for gender, and compared it to a known signaling system for gender (properties of given names). The result is that despite the large gender differences in the linguistic variable, it performs poorly as

Presented at UKLVC 10

Poster (PDF)


Is it really, um, informative?

Josef Fruehwald (2015)

Abstract

A presentation on early results on filled pause preferences. Presented to the Language Variation and Change group ad Edinburgh, and the Edinburgh Disfluency Group.

Presented at Edinburgh Language Variation and Change Research Group and Edinburgh Disfluency Research Group

HTML5 Slides


/Vwl/ Systems

Josef Fruehwald (2014)

Abstract

Dinkin (2013) proposed that /æl/ has merged to /awl/ in the Philadelphia dialect. He argued that: /l/ has replaced /w/ as the offglide target for /aw/. This facilitated the merger of /æl/ to /awl/. I extend this argument to /uwl/ and /owl/. Using vowel trajectory data from the Philadelphia Neighborhood

Presented at NWAV 43

Slides [html]


Automation and sociophonetics

Josef Fruehwald (2014)

Abstract

This talk will focus on the benefits of automation in vowel analysis, and what insights we can arrive at when we have 10x or 100x the number of vowel measurements than conventional studies. I will begin with a description of the FAVE suite (Rosenfelder et al 2011) which automates the

Presented at Methods in Dialectology XV

Slides [html]


Forced Alignment and Vowel Extraction for Sociophonetics

Josef Fruehwald (2014)

Abstract

A lab talk given to the Glasgow University Laboratory of Phonetics (GULP) about Forced Alignment and Vowel Extraction. Included are discussions of The benefits of automation. The way FAVE-align works. The way FAVE-extract works. The slides are reveal.js, so you'll need to use the dow arrow to go through each

HTML5 Slides


Against Gradual Phonologization

Josef Fruehwald (2014)

Abstract

The conventional wisdom regarding phonologization is that it progresses as a sequence of gradual reanalyses: natural acoustic, physiological and perceptual phenomena are re- analyzed as gradient coarticulatory processes, which are then reanalyzed as categorical phonological processes (Ohala, 1981; Berm´udez-Otero, 2007). I argue that this model of gradual and gradient reanalyses

Presented at Symposium on Historical Phonology

Poster PDF


'I'm done my homework' - Case assignment in a stative passive.

Josef Fruehwald and Neil Myler (2013)

Abstract

We present an analysis of an underdescribed construction common to Canadian and Philadelphian English dialects which appears to involve an instance of the copula/passive auxiliary be, a participial form of finish or do, and a DP complement receiving accusative Case (see Yerastov (2008) for a descriprition and discussion of its

Presented at PLC 37

Handout [PDF]


Phonologically Conditioned Phonetic Change

Josef Fruehwald (2012)

Abstract

I argue that some phonetic changes must be phonologically conditioned from their outset. I support this argument based on two conditioned sound changes in Philadelphia: /ay/ raising and /ey/ raising. /ay/ raising has always interacted opaquely with /t/ and /d/ flapping, suggesting it has always been sensitive to the underlying

Presented at NWAV 41

Poster + Handout [PDF]


Phonology has an Early Infuence on Sound Change

Josef Fruehwald (2012)

Abstract

The consensus view of conditioned sound changes is that they begin as low-level phonetic biases which become compounded in the production-perception feedback loop (Ohala, 1981; Pierrehumbert, 2002; Blevins, 2004; Bermudez-Otero, 2007, inter alia). I argue against this consensus view that, instead, the conditioning on sound changes is phonological from the

Presented at NELS 42

Poster [PDF]
Handout [PDF]


Using Speech Community Data as Phonological Evidence

Josef Fruehwald (2011)

Abstract

Presented at NELS 42

Poster [PDF]


The Phonological Aspect of Phonetic Change

Josef Fruehwald (2011)

Abstract

I discuss the formulation of phonetic change as shifting phonetic implementation of relatively stable phonological objects, and how this model can be utilized for linguistic investigation.

Presented at NWAV 40

Handout [PDF]


New results from hierarchical models of the community grammar

Josef Fruehwald and Laurel MacKenzie (2012)

Abstract

We explore the novel results made possible by fitting hierarchical models to speech community data. Specifically, these models produce estimates for the degree to which a speech community coheres to a communal norm.

Presented at NWAV 40

Handout [PDF]


Phonetic Change and Phonology

Josef Fruehwald (2011)

Abstract

In this paper, I will attempt to support the following two arguments Phonetic change is a distinct type of language change, displaying qualitatively different dynamics from syntactic, morphological, and phonological change. However, there is good evidence that categorical phonology plays a crucial role in the mediation of phonetic change. I

Presented at MFM 19

Handout [PDF]


Mergers, Distinctions, and Shifts

Josef Fruehwald (2010)

Abstract

Using data from the Atlas of North American English, I try to determine whether it is the phonetic gap created by the low-back merger or the phonological collapse which acts as a trigger for TRAP retraction STRUT lowering.

Presented at NSF IGERT 2010 Project Meeting

Poster [PDF]


Vowel Shifts and the Phonology Phonetics Interface

Josef Fruehwald (2010)

Abstract

I will be arguing from data on vowel shifts in progress, and from principles of language change, that language specific phonetic implementation rules must be part of speaker knowledge, and thus part of language acquisition. Then, I will sketch an abstract model of what phonetic implementation could be like. Having

Presented at NAPhC 6

Handout [PDF]


Report from the R Study Group: What I couldn't have done otherwise

Josef Fruehwald (2009)

Abstract

This is report on the first R study group which was held at Penn Summer 2009. I report both on the success of the study group, as well as some new analyses of well known linguistic variables (TD Deletion and ING).

Presented at Splunch

Handout [PDF]
R Code


Evaluation and simulation of exemplar theoretic -t/-d deletion

Josef Fruehwald (2008)

Abstract

I evaluate a model of TD-Deletion where the morphological effect is generated by an Exemplar Theoretic production-perception feedback loop like proposed in Bybee (2002). I find that 1) it is insufficient to produce morphological differences of the required magnitude and 2) that it produces the wrong shape of linguistic change.

Presented at NWAV 37

Handout [PDF]