Journal Papers

Generations, lifespans, and the zeitgeist

Josef Fruehwald (2017)

Abstract

This paper is equal parts methodological recommendation and an empirical investigation of the time dimensions of linguistic change. It is increasingly common in the sociolinguistic literature for researchers to utilize speech data that was collected over the course of many decades. These kinds of datasets contain three different time dimensions

Published Language Variation and Change 29.1 pp 1-27

Journal


The Role of Phonology in Phonetic Change

Josef Fruehwald (2017)

Abstract

This article reviews the role phonology plays in phonetic changes. After first establishing what kinds of changes qualify as phonetic changes for the purposes of discussion, and laying out the theoretical outlook that is adopted here, I review the most obvious cases in which phonology plays a role in phonetic

Published Annual Review of Linguistics 3 pp 25-42

Journal


Filled Pause Choice as a Sociolinguistic Variable

Josef Fruehwald (2016)

Abstract

In this paper, I argue that filled pause selection (um/uh) is a sociolinguistic variable, conditioned by both internal and external factors. There appears to be a language change in progress towards selecting um more often than uh. In all respects, the (UHM) variable appears to pattern quantiatively just like all

Published Penn Working Papers in Linguistics 22.2 pp 41-49

Journal


The early influence of phonology on a phonetic change

Josef Fruehwald (2016)

Abstract

The conventional wisdom regarding the diachronic process whereby phonetic phenomena become phonologized appears to be the 'error accumulation' model, so called by Baker, Archangeli, and Mielke (2011). Under this model, biases in the phonetic context result in production or perception errors, which are misapprehended by listeners as target productions, and

Published Language 92.2 pp 376-410

Journal


Variation and change in the use of Hestiation markers in Germanic languages.

Martijn Wieling , Jack Grieve , Gosse Bouma , Josef Fruehwald , John Coleman and Mark Liberman (2016)

Abstract

In this study, we investigate cross-linguistic patterns in the alternation between UM, a hesitation marker consisting of a neutral vowel followed by a final labial nasal, and UH, a hesitation marker consisting of a neutral vowel in an open syllable. Based on a quantitative analysis of a range of spoken

Published Language Dynamics and Change

Journal


I'm done my homework- Case assignment in a stative passive

Josef Fruehwald and Neil Myler (2015)

Abstract

We present an analysis of an understudied construction found in Philadelphia and Canadian English, and also in certain Vermont varieties. In this construction, the participle of certain verbs can appear along with a form of the verb be and a DP complement, producing strings like I'm done my homework, I'm

Published Linguistic Variation 15.2 p141-168

Accepted Draft
Journal


An Evaluation of Sociolinguistic Elicitation Methods

Zac Boyd , Zuzanna Elliott , Josef Fruehwald and Lauren Hall-Lew (2015)

Abstract

This study investigates the effects of different elicitation methods on the speech of a single speaker of San Francisco English who is participating in a systematic set of vocalic sound changes known as the California Vowel Shift. We contrast data obtained from classic sociolinguistic interview methods with data from self-recordings,

Published ICPhS

Proceedings


Phonological Rule Change: The Constant Rate Effect

Josef Fruehwald , Jonathan Gress-Wright and Joel Wallenberg (2013)

Abstract

The detailed quantitative study of language change, as found in studies such as Labov (1994) and Kroch (1989), has raised two central questions for linguistic theory. The first is an issue in the theory of language change itself, namely: do changes in different components of the grammar progress in the

Presented at NELS 40, 2009

Published Proceedings NELS 40

Paper


One Hundred Years of Sound Change in Philadelphia: Linear Incrementation, Reversal, and Reanalysis

William Labov , Ingrid Rosenfelder and Josef Fruehwald (2013)

Abstract

The study of sound change in progress in Philadelphia has been facilitated by the application of forced alignment and automatic vowel measurement to a large corpus of neighborhood studies, including 379 speakers with dates of birth from 1888 to 1991. Two of the sound changes active in the 1970s show

Published Language 89.1 p30-65

Paper


Cross Derivational Feeding is Epiphenomenal

Josef Fruehwald and Kyle Gorman (2011)

Abstract

Bakovic (2005) proposes that patterns of sufficiently-similar segment avoidance are the result of interacting agreement and antigemination constraints, a pattern known as cross-derivational feeding (CDF). The bleeding interactions between epenthesis and assimilation which prevent adjacent sufficiently-similar segments in English are shown to follow, however, from extragrammatical considerations. Several case studies

Presented at NAPhC 6, ILLS 2 [PDF]

Published Studies in the Linguistic Sciences 2011:36-50

Paper


Redevelopment of a Morphological Class

Josef Fruehwald (2012)

Abstract

In this paper, I will be focusing on the difference between semiweak and regular past tense in terms of TD Deletion. Specifically, I will pursue a revised version of the analysis in Guy and Boyd (1990), casting it in terms of Competing Grammars (Kroch, 1989) and Distributed Morphology (Halle and

Presented at PLC 35, 2011

Published PWPL 18.1

Handout
Paper


The Spread of Raising: Opacity, Lexicalization, and diffusion

Josef Fruehwald (2008)

Abstract

The centralization of the low upgliding diphthong (typically called Canadian Raising, here just Raising), is frequently cited as an example of phonological opacity. Conditioned by a following voiceless segment, Raising continues to apply when an underlying unstressed /t/ is flapped on the surface. Dialects which have both Raising and Flapping,

Presented at NWAV 36, 2008

Published Penn Working Papers in Linguistics 14.2

Paper


The Spread of Raising: Opacity, Lexicalization, and diffusion

Josef Fruehwald (2007)

Abstract

Canadian Raising is typically described as the centralization of the nucleus of /ay/ before voiceless segments. However some recent studies in areas affected by Raising have shown that the current conditioning factors are not as regular as reported previously (Vance, 1987; Dailey-OCain, 1997; Hall, 2005). This paper explores the status

Published as Undergraduate Thesis

Paper