Invited Talks


Filled Pauses as a um... Sociolinguistic Variable

Josef Fruehwald (2015)

Abstract

Presented at Disfluency in Spontaneous Speech, 2015

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Filled Pauses as a um... Sociolinguistic Variable

Josef Fruehwald (2015)

Abstract

In a number of spoken corpora of English, German, Dutch, Norwegian, Danish and Faroese, the filled pause 'um' is increasing in usage frequency relative to 'uh' (Tottie, 2011; Wieling et al, fortcoming). The pattern of the change looks like a textbook language change in progress, even though this is a

Presented at NYU Linguistics Colloquium Series

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Big Data and Sociolinguistics

Josef Fruehwald (2015)

Abstract

Along with many other strains of evidence, sociolinguistics of the future is going to be utilizing "Big Data," as are most social sciences. Of course, this means that sociolinguistic researchers are going to need to get training in building and using tools for managing and analyzing our growing data sets.

Presented at Penn Linguistics Conference 39

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How Phonetic Changes Happen

Josef Fruehwald (2014)

Abstract

In this talk, I'll walk through a careful case study of a change in pronunciation that took place in Philadelphia across the 20th century which is based on acoustic analysis of archival recordings. The goal is to revisit some first principles about how changes like these take place. For people

Presented at Newcastle University

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The Phonological Influence on Phonetic Change

Josef Fruehwald (2014)

Abstract

There is a conventional wisdom regarding phonetic changes that their grounding and motivating forces are similarly phonetic, e.g. the gradual accumulation of perceptual and articulatory errors, which I will argue is at best incomplete. In investigating language changes in progress as observed in the Philadelphia Neighborhood Corpus (Labov, Rosenfelder &

Presented at University of York

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Against Gradual Phonologization

Josef Fruehwald (2013)

Abstract

This talk was a summary of my argument that phonological conditioning is present at the onset of conditioned phonetic changes, not as a later stage reanalysis.

Presented at mFiL 2013

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Analyzing the rate of language change

Josef Fruehwald (2012)

Abstract

In this talk, I will argue that it is possible to determine whether the influence of one segment on another is phonetic or phonological by examining how they interact during sound change. I will begin with an introduction to the Philadelphia Neighborhood Corpus, which has been developed at Penn. It

Presented at Newcastle University, School of English Literature, Language and Linguistics


Using Speech Community Data as Phonological Evidence

Josef Fruehwald (2011)

Abstract

Classically, patterns of systematic alternations or static distributions in the description of a language have constituted the lion's share of phonological evidence. More recently, laboratory studies have been added to the collection of evidentiary tools for phonological investigation. Both of these approaches have provided the foundations of modern phonological theory,

Presented at Penn State Center for Language Science

Slides [PDF]